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Catherine Chicoine
Lives in Stockholm, Sweden.
#art   #inspiration
Ask me anything
Apr 23 '14

daughtersofdig:

black-culture:

Emotion and expressing emotion are human traits. Don’t rob boys of their humanity. @zellieimani

2brwngrls yes keep this dialogue going its the only way to impact the next generation with more positivity! 

64,528 notes (via retromantique & black-culture)

Apr 23 '14

(Source: jenniferbarkley)

59,989 notes (via retromantique & jenniferbarkley)

Apr 22 '14

petitepasserine:

white women of hollywood, reducing japan and japanese culture to cupcakes, sexy ”costumes” and submissive sex-kittens since god knows when

28,934 notes (via kohakuhibiki & petitepasserine)

Apr 22 '14

gokuma:

mad-lynn:

fuzzytek:

The backlog of rape kits has put justice on hold for a lot of people. Back in 2009, more than 11,000 untested kits were found in a Detroit Police Department storage facility. Some were more than 25 years old.

Mariska Hargitay speaks on some of the issues surrounding the rape kit backlog in Detroit, Michigan. #endthebacklog (x)

It costs between $1,000 – $1,500 to test every single rape kit. There are over 10,000 kits left in Detroit’s rape kit backlog. Your donation can go directly to testing them. Donate to the Detroit Crime Commission’s backlog initiative by clicking here.

I am pretty explicitly anti-police in every respect. But I support Wayne County prosecutor Kym Worthy and her push to catalogue the egregious backlog of unprocessed rape kits in Detroit. 

Her work has already identified countless serial rapists in southeast Michigan, and will continue to identify these rapist pieces of shit as she moves forward.

Who cares if this process leads to conviction or not. Just give us the list. We can take care of the rest.

"After Detroit tested the first 10% of its backlogged kits, authorities were able to link cases to 46 serial rapists." (x)

Just think about it: 46 serial rapists. And the evidence against them was out there, all the time, in those backlogged kits. And that’s just 10% of them

(Source: finding-our-power)

33,894 notes (via kohakuhibiki & finding-our-power)

Apr 22 '14

Alek Wek by Sølve Sundsbø for I-D Magazine

Alek Wek by Sølve Sundsbø for I-D Magazine

(Source: stevensmizel)

7,970 notes (via witcheslookbook & stevensmizel)Tags: inspiration

Apr 22 '14

(Source: suedeskins)

209 notes (via witcheslookbook & suedeskins)Tags: inspiration

Apr 22 '14

americaniallhoran:

qirlunderyou:

christmonsterx:

Remember this? This is iconic

This is the best promotion she’s ever done let’s be quite honest

not just promotion but it really shows us that she knows 100% what everyone is saying about her and its almost inspiring seeing how strong she is about all of this

7,316 notes (via kohakuhibiki & christmonsterx)

Apr 22 '14

biokitty:

Jesus

(Source: sandandglass)

31,723 notes (via penandpoison & sandandglass)Tags: daily show

Apr 22 '14

A white girl wore a bindi at Coachella. And, then my social media feeds went berserk. Hashtagging the term “cultural appropriation” follows the outrage and seems to justify it at the same time. Except that it doesn’t.

Cultural appropriation is the adoption of a specific part of one culture by another cultural group. As I (an Indian) sit here, eating my sushi dinner (Japanese) and drinking tea (Chinese), wearing denim jeans (American), and overhearing Brahm’s Lullaby (German) from the baby’s room, I can’t help but think what’s the big deal?

The big deal with cultural appropriation is when the new adoption is void of the significance that it was supposed to have — it strips the religious, historical and cultural context of something and makes it mass-marketable. That’s pretty offensive. The truth is, I wouldn’t be on this side of the debate if we were talking about Native American headdresses, or tattoos of Polynesian tribal iconography, Chinese characters or Celtic bands.

Why shouldn’t the bindi warrant the same kind of response as the other cultural symbols I’ve listed, you ask? Because most South Asians won’t be able to tell you the religious significance of a bindi. Of my informal survey of 50 Hindu women, not one could accurately explain it’s history, religious or spiritual significance. I had to Google it myself, and I’ve been wearing one since before I could walk.

We can’t accuse non-Hindus of turning the bindi into a fashion accessory with little religious meaning because, well, we’ve already done that. We did it long before Vanessa Hudgens in Coachella 2014, long before Selena Gomez at the MTV Awards in 2013, and even before Gwen Stefani in the mid-90s.

Indian statesman Rajan Zed justifies the opposing view as he explains, “[The bindi] is an auspicious religious and spiritual symbol… It is not meant to be thrown around loosely for seductive effects or as a fashion accessory…” If us Indians had preserved the sanctity and holiness of the bindi, Zed’s argument for cultural appropriation would have been airtight. But, the reality is, we haven’t.

The 5,000 year old tradition of adorning my forehead with kumkum just doesn’t seem to align with the current bindi collection in my dresser — the 10-pack, crystal-encrusted, multi-colored stick-on bindis that have been designed to perfectly compliment my outfit. I didn’t happen to pick up these modern-day bindis at a hyper-hipster spot near my new home in California. No. This lot was brought from the motherland itself.

And, that’s just it. Culture evolves. Indians appreciated the beauty of a bindi and brought it into the world of fashion several decades ago. The single red dot that once was, transformed into a multitude of colors and shapes embellished with all the glitz and glamor that is inherent in Bollywood. I don’t recall an uproar when Indian actress Madhuri Dixit’s bindi was no longer a traditional one. Hindus accepted the evolution of this cultural symbol then. And, as the bindi makes it’s way to the foreheads of non-South Asians, we should accept — even celebrate — the continued evolution of this cultural symbol. Not only has it managed to transcend religion and class in a sea of one-billion brown faces, it will now adorn the faces of many more races. And that’s nothing short of amazing.

So, you won’t find this Hindu posting a flaming tweet accusing a white girl of #culturalappropriation. I will say that I’m glad you find this aspect of my culture beautiful. I do too.

Why a Bindi Is NOT an Example of Culture Appropriation 

by Anjali Joshi

(via breannekiele)

15,582 notes (via jagzilla & breannekiele)Tags: cultural appropriation bindi

Apr 22 '14

armisael:

please watch avril lavigne’s new video it is so much worse than you are imagining as you are reading this, it is so much worse than anyone could have ever guessed it would be

41,227 notes (via penandpoison & armisael)

Apr 22 '14

ursulatheseabitchh:

The last three Disney films that starred POC were the Emperor’s New Groove in 2000, Brother Bear in 2003 and Princess and the Frog in 2009.

What did they have in common?

image

image

image

Exactly.

86,544 notes (via penandpoison & ursulatheseabitchh)

Apr 22 '14

sirensongfashion:

cheapbrain:

thesoftghetto:

sirensongfashion:

Tanishq Wedding Collection NIKAH

Print campaign for Tanishq brand of jewellery showcasing their collection of wedding jewellery for ‘The NIkah Ceremony’, which is the islamic/muslim indian bridal ceremony.

//Photography: Sharon Nayak

21,571 notes (via vampirecandy & sirensongfashion)

Apr 22 '14

retromantique:

Fit-phew

(Source: vmagazine)

16,877 notes (via retromantique & vmagazine)

Apr 21 '14

Anonymous asked:

How do dick pics make u feel?

ladyironlungs:

the-inspired-lesbian:

This is the fucking funniest thing I have ever seen omfg.

75,942 notes (via penandpoison & the-inspired-lesbian)

Apr 21 '14

To be white, or straight, or male, or middle class is to be simultaneously ubiquitious and invisible. You’re everywhere you look, you’re the standard against which everyone else is measured. You’re like water, like air. People will tell you they went to see a “woman doctor” or they will say they went to see “the doctor.” People will tell you they have a “gay colleague” or they’ll tell you about a colleague. A white person will be happy to tell you about a “Black friend,” but when that same person simply mentions a “friend,” everyone will assume the person is white. Any college course that doesn’t have the word “woman” or “gay” or “minority” in its title is a course about men, heterosexuals, and white people. But we call those courses “literature,” “history” or “political science.”

This invisibility is political.

— Michael S. Kimmel, in the introduction to the book, “Privilege: A Reader” (via thinkspeakstress)

59,968 notes (via retromantique & thinkspeakstress)